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WSJ.com: What's News US Sun, 24 Jun 2018 17:56:46 EDT
WSJ.com: What's News Technology Sun, 24 Jun 2018 00:31:11 EDT
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WSJ.com: US Business Sun, 24 Jun 2018 17:58:24 EDT
  • GE Nears Deal to Sell Industrial-Engines Unit  - General Electric is nearing a deal to sell a unit that makes large industrial engines to private-equity firm Advent International for $3 billion or more, people familiar with the matter said.
  • Shari Redstone's Path to Power  - How heiress Shari Redstone overcame a falling out with her father to become the most significant female media owner in America.
  • Intel CEO Challenge: Pick From Thin Bench, or Look Outside  - Brian Krzanich’s resignation this week leaves Intel’s board with a tough choice: Name the next CEO from a small pool of internal candidates, or go outside for the first time in the chip maker’s 50-year history.
  • The Second Wave of Luxury Electric Cars  - Old guard auto makers are mounting a challenge to Tesla with their own premium electric vehicles.
  • Big Media Firms Pay CEOs More for Less  - Chief executives in the media and telecom industries made twice as much as their peers in the S&P 500 even though the group’s performance came up short.
  • Trump Threatens 20% Tariff on European Cars  - President Trump threatened tariffs on European Union-made cars, citing barriers to American exports and the need for incentives to move production to the U.S.
  • State Sales-Tax Officials Rev Their Engines  - Some state tax officials have begun preparing to use the new sales-tax collection power the Supreme Court handed them on Thursday.
  • Eurozone Business Activity Picks Up  - Business activity in the eurozone picked up in June for the first month in five—a first sign that the currency area’s economy may be shaking off a sluggish start to the year.
  • A Generation of Americans Is Entering Old Age the Least Prepared in Decades  - Low incomes, paltry savings, high debt burdens, broken family structures, failed insurance—the U.S. is upending decades of progress in securing life’s final chapter. According to a Wall Street Journal tally, more than 40% of households led by people aged 55 through 70 lack sufficient resources to maintain their living standards.
  • Job Layoff Gauge Falls Heading into the Summer Months  - The number of Americans filing applications for new unemployment benefits fell for the fourth straight week in mid-June, signaling continued strength in the labor market.
  • Why Big-Ticket Items May Soon Cost You More Online  - The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling enables states to collect sales tax from all online purchases, eliminating the advantage of buying some big-ticket items from websites like Amazon.com.
  • GE Factories in Wisconsin, South Carolina Caught in U.S. Trade Fight  - GE’s MRI business offers a window into the complex interconnections of global trade, where components made in one country get assembled in another and may be sold back into the first.
  • U.S. Shale Companies Motor Ahead Despite OPEC  - U.S. shale companies, which kept pumping when the rest of the world cut back oil production, are in a strong position to benefit now that the OPEC is boosting its output.
  • Amazon's Face-Scanning Surveillance Software Contrasts With Its Privacy Stance  - Facial-recognition technology enables governments and private enterprise to track citizens anywhere there is a camera, even if they’re not carrying any devices. It’s a stark example of a technology that is being deployed faster than society and the law can adopt new norms and rules, writes Christopher Mims.
  • Are You Retired or Semi-Retired? Check Your Tax Withholding Now  - A little-noticed effect of last year’s tax overhaul is that many pension payments are now larger. But this bump-up increases the risk that recipients will be underwithheld at tax time next year—and therefore owe a penalty. Tax Report columnist Laura Saunders tell you how to avoid this scenario.
  • Ex-1MDB Investigator Appointed as Malaysia's Central Bank Governor  - Malaysia named Nor Shamsiah Mohd Yunus, a former central-bank official involved in an investigation into state-investment fund 1Malaysia Development Bhd., as governor of the regulator.
  • Cummins Will Pay Tariff to Import Engines From Its Own Plants in China  - Cummins, which imports engines and other products from its factories in China, is among U.S. companies likely to be stung by an American tariff on Chinese-made goods that takes effect next month.
  • Police: Operator in Self-Driving Uber Crash Was Streaming 'The Voice'  - The test operator of a self-driving Uber car that hit and killed a pedestrian in Arizona last March was streaming the TV show “The Voice” on her phone just before the collision, police say.
  • AT&T's Interest in Ad Tech Gets Thumbs Up on Madison Avenue  - News of AT&T’s talks to acquire advertising tech firm AppNexus was welcomed by marketers, who are eager to have more options in the online ad sector beyond the dominant players Google and Facebook.
  • Weinstein Co. Cuts Deal Price by $23 Million to Close Sale to Lantern  - A Weinstein Co. lawyer said Friday that the studio has agreed to reduce the proposed purchase price for the business by $23 million to close the sale of its film and television assets to private-equity firm Lantern Capital Partners.
WSJ.com: Markets Fri, 22 Jun 2018 10:04:06 EDT
  • CEO Loss Forces Intel to Face Its Future  - The surprise resignation of Intel’s CEO means the chip maker needs to deal with longer-term challenges now.
  • Beijing Paddles Hard as a Bear Market Threatens  - Chinese stocks are down nearly 20% from their most recent high. Beijing has to balance its desire for market stability with a need to keep up the impression of calm.
  • For Investors, Europe is Back to Muddling Through  - Confidence can more easily be lost than won. After 2017’s strong growth and political calm brought hopes that Europe was finally turning a post-crisis page, 2018 is back to unfinished business.
  • Kroger Spends Money to Make Money  - U.S. grocery giant Kroger is investing in meal kits, online delivery and more to keep up with consumer trends.
  • Come Back for Seconds at Olive Garden Parent  - Darden Restaurants has had a successful turnaround, but its shares remain attractive in an industry that has some positive economic tailwinds.
  • Japan's Yen: A Currency for All Seasons?  - It’s been a stormy 2018 for markets, with volatility returning, trade tensions ratcheting higher and global growth proving less solid than expected. Investors looking for the financial equivalent of all-weather gear might find it in the Japanese yen.
  • Beauty Stocks' Rise Is Looking Increasingly Cosmetic  - Chinese shoppers have boosted the likes of Estée Lauder and Shiseido, but investors should remember fashions can be fickle.
  • Why Disney Can Afford to Pay More for Fox  - Disney’s blockbuster track record, along with some unique quirks of comic book history, explain why it can top Comcast’s bid for 21st Century Fox’s entertainment assets.
  • Why Home Prices Have Nowhere to Go But Up  - There are a lot of people who would like to buy a house, and plenty of them can afford to. Finding a house to buy? That is another issue.
WSJ.com: Opinion Sun, 24 Jun 2018 00:30:03 EDT
  • Robbers, Cellphones and the Law  - A 5-4 Supreme Court ruling rejects Fourth Amendment precedent.
  • Charles Krauthammer  - His journalism was rooted in facts and principle.
  • The Jersey Tax Spiral Continues  - New Governor Phil Murphy follows the Connecticut model.
  • Mueller's Fruit of the Poisonous Tree  - It makes no difference how honorable he is. His investigation is tainted by the bias that attended its origin in 2016.
  • Did an Ancient Greek Anticipate Trump?  - Heraclitus’ view of the world in constant flux found echoes in Hegel and now in the president.
  • 'I Bet on the Wrong Horse,' Says an Unrepentant 101-Year-Old Spy  - Convicted alongside the Rosenbergs in 1953, Morton Sobell still shrugs at communism’s horrors.
  • A California Billionaire Sets Michigan's Energy Policy  - Tom Steyer cuts a deal with utilities to promote alternative fuels, obviating the need for voter input.
  • Thirty Years On, How Well Do Global Warming Predictions Stand Up?  - James Hansen issued dire warnings in the summer of 1988. Today earth is only modestly warmer.
  • A Tesla Crackup Foretold  - The real problem is that governments everywhere have ordained that electric cars will be sold at a loss.
  • Don't Count on an Aging Germany to Save the Euro  - Berlin has a responsible fiscal policy, but it faces a demographic crisis worse than anywhere but Japan.
  • Kids in Cages  - There is a Trumpian solution to illegal immigration: Let the economy control it.
  • When Will Washington Stop Helping Amazon?  - The Supreme Court gives the online giant a new advantage to squash potential competitors.
 
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