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 WEATHER & BASS LOCATION      -   Bass Facts Main Menu, Click Here!
Weather plays a greater role in the daily activity of largemouth bass than any other factor. To improve your success, you should know how the following weather conditions affect bass fishing.
STABLE WEATHER. When weather conditions are stable or gradually changing, bass go through a routine of feeding and resting that is often predictable from one day to the next. For example, during an extended period of overcast weather, a school of bass may feed on a sharp-breaking point at midday, then drop back into deeper water. The school usually repeats this daily pattern, as long as weather conditions remain stable.

FRONTS. Largemouths feed heavily just before a strong cold front, often providing spectacular fishing for several hours. But once the front arrives, they eat very little until 1 or 2 days after the system passes. Catching bass under these conditions is difficult and requires special techniques with lighter lines and smaller lures. A cold front affects bass fishing in the following manner:

Warm Fronts affect bass in different ways, depending on the season and water temperatures. A series of warm days in spring or fall will raise water temperatures in the shallows, causing bass to feed.

In Winter, several unusually warm days may draw bass toward the surface to absorb the warmth of the sun. The fish become more accessible to fishermen and more likely to feed or take a lure. But a string of hot days in summer may warm a shallow lake or pond so much that largemouths become sluggish and difficult to catch.

CIRRUS CLOUDS usually precede a major cold front. These clouds may be 100 miles ahead of an approaching front. They indicate that largemouths will soon be feeding heavily.

THUNDERHEADS build as a front approaches. Lightning and strong winds often accompany these towering clouds. The feeding frenzy may peak just before these clouds arrive.

STALLED FRONTS may leave skies overcast for several days. Look for bass feeding in the shallows during this low-light condition.

CLEAR SKY following a cold front filters out few of the sunís rays. Light penetrates deeper into the water, forcing bass to move out of the shallows.

CUMULUS CLOUDS promise better fishing. The white, fluffy clouds signal that the cold front has passed. Bass will soon resume their normal activity.


How Wind Affects Bass Fishing

WIND. Like warming trends, wind can either improve or ruin fishing. A steady wind will concentrate minute organisms near shore or along timber and brush lines. Baitfish feed in these areas, attracting bass and other predators. In spring, warm winds blowing from the same direction for several days can pile up warm water on the downwind shore. This warmer water holds more bass than other areas of the lake.

Waves washing into shore loosen soil and debris, creating a band of muddy water. Bass hang along the mud line, where they can avoid bright light, but still dart into clear water to grab food.
If the wind becomes too strong, it can impair fishing success in shallow areas. Turbulence caused by heavy waves pushes bass into deeper water, where they are harder to find. In shallow lakes, strong winds often churn the water enough to make the entire lake murky, slowing fishing for several days.

Calm Conditions enable bass in clear water to see objects above them. Fishermen and boaters easily spook bass in shallow water. Wave action bends or refracts light rays, making it more difficult for largemouths to see movements on or above the surface.

CALM Conditions (left) enable bass in clear water to see objects above them. Fishermen and boaters easily spook bass in shallow water. Wave action (right) bends or refracts light rays, making it more difficult for largemouths to see movement on or above the surface.

WAVES breaking against shore dislodge food items. Winds also push planton toward shore, attracting minnows. Bass move in to feed.

How Rain Affects Bass Fishing

RAIN. Rainy weather usually improves bass fishing. The overcast skies reduce light penetration, so bass are more comfortable in shallow water. In reservoirs, runoff flows into the back ends of coves. The murky water causes bass to move in and feed. The same situation occurs near stream inlets, drainage ditches or storm sewer pipes on many natural lakes.

Fishing success may decline during and after heavy rains. Runoff from torrential rains can muddy an entire body of water, causing fish to stop biting. Angling remains slow until the water clears, which may take several days or weeks.

Lightning and thunder drive largemouths into the depths. If the weather looks threatening, you should head for shore immediately. Your boat may be the highest point on the lake, making you vulnerable to a lightning strike.

Experienced fishermen can identify certain clouds and other atmospheric conditions that indicate coming changes in the weather. They know how bass react to these changes and plan their angling strategy accordingly.

HEAVY RUNOFF into clear lakes creates patches of muddy water. Bass congregate wherever turbid water enters the lake, such as the inlets of streams and drainage ditches, or near storm sewer pipes.

LIGHTNING AND THUNDER drive largemouths into the depths. If the weather looks threatening, head for shore immediately. Your boat may be the highest point on the lake, making you vulnerable to a lightning strike.

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